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Proactive Sleep

Sleep Inertia


Sleep inertia, or in other words, the grogginess you feel upon waking up in the morning, is due to the brain functioning differently than normal during sleep, some claiming that it is largely due to lower cerebral blood flow[1][2]. Thus, anything that increases cerebral blood flow, such as brain activity may decrease sleep inertia and make you feel more refreshed in the morning [3]. These scientific experiments have demonstrated that:


     • Waking up is a gradual process[4].

     • The adverse effects of sleep inertia can be totally abolished by a moderately intense continuous noise[5].

     • Countermeasures to sleep inertia include physical or mental exercise, external noise, bright light, and caffeine [6].

     • Bright light reduces sleep inertia after napping[7].

     • Stimulating tasks (such as the Proactive Games) may promote alertness when sleep deprived[8][9].


For Proactive Sleep 1.0 we focused on well supported solutions, which included auditory and motor stimulation to combat sleep inertia, or in other words, the grogginess you feel right after waking up.

1) Ferraro & De Gennaro, 2000. The sleep inertia phenomenon during the sleep-wake transition: theoretical and operational issues. Aviat Space Environ Med 71. pg. 843-848.

2) Kuboyama, T., Hori, A., Sato, T., Mikami, T., Yamaki, T., & Ueda, S. (1997). Changes in cerebral blood flow velocity in healthy young men during overnight sleep and while awake. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology 102, 125-131.

3) Tassi, P & Muet, A. 2000. Sleep Inertia. Sleep Medicine Reviews, 4, 4, 341-353.

4) Tassi P, Nicolas A, Dewasmes G et al (1992). Effects of noise on sleep inertia as a function of circadian placement of a one-hour nap. Percept Motor Skills, 75: 291-302.

5) Hajak, G., Klingelhofer, J., Schulz-Varszegi, M., Matzander, G., Sander, D., Conrad, B., & Ruther, E (1994). Relationship between cerebral blood flow velocities and cerebral electrical activity in sleep. Sleep 17, pg. 11-19.

6) Ferraro & De Gennaro. (2000). The sleep inertia phenomenon during the sleep-wake transition: theoretical and operational issues. Aviat Space Environ Med 71. pg. 843-848.

7) Hayashi, M., Masuda, A., & Hori, T. (2003). The alerting effects of caffeine, bright light and face washing after a short daytime nap. Clinical Neurophysiology 114, 2268-2278.

8) Baulk, S., Reyner, L., & Horne, J. (2001) Driver sleepiness-evaluation of reaction time measurement as a secondary task. Sleep, 24, 695-698.

9) Rupp, T., Arnedt, T., Acebo, C., & Carskadon, M. (2004). Performance on a dual driving simulation and subtraction task following sleep restriction. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 99, 739-753.

Proactive Sleep ™ is a Proactive Life product.
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